Monthly Archives: May 2013

Philosophical progress?

David Chalmers recently addressed the Moral Sciences Club at Cambridge, and he jokingly announced at the beginning that everything he was about to say was not to leave the room. Of course, there are links to the talk everywhere now, … Continue reading

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Kantian philosophy, part 5: what to do about space

The invention or discover of non-Euclidean geometry really messed up philosophers’ claims to apriori knowledge. For centuries, philosophers were sure that claims like, “The angles of a triangle are equal to two right angles” are paradigmatically clear examples of apriori … Continue reading

Posted in Kant and/or Hume, Metaphysical musings | 2 Comments

Kantian philosophy, part 4: whether our fixed paradigm is natural

In the previous posts, I’ve been pursuing the idea that our ability to understand experience – interpret it and offer explanations and justifications – requires making a Kantian move: we should postulate some structure inherent to our minds that formats … Continue reading

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From Jacques Barzun to his grandson

Recalled here: “When you have worked through it, by further reflection and some decision as to the immediate future it will turn into something like a path marked on a map, to be followed for a good while and possibly … Continue reading

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Book review: why the Enlightenment still matters

Book review by Ollie Cussan of Pagden, The Enlightenment and why it still matters, in Prospect: The Enlightenment’s great achievement, Pagden argues, was to repair the bonds of mankind. Its distinctive feature was not that it held history, nature, theology … Continue reading

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Kantian philosophy, part 3: from thin to thick Kantianism

The central claim in Kant’s philosophy is that our experience is somehow formatted by the nature of our understanding. Why think this is so? In part 2, I made a general case for thinking that humans are special in that … Continue reading

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